‘Small’ towns in eye of beholder

I once attended a meeting in Fargo, N.D., where one of the speakers, who worked for an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, mentioned that he enjoyed visiting “the small towns.” He was accustomed to major metropolitan areas, I suppose, so Fargo probably seemed small to him, even though it’s North Dakota’s largest city.

Folks at the event smiled politely. But I suspect almost all of there were thinking, “You figure Fargo is small? Then clearly you don’t know much about the Upper Midwest.”

I thought of that speaker this morning, when I attended Eastern Ag Day in Hatton, N.D. The event  was organized by officials with the North Dakota State University Extension Service and intended for farmers in the eastern part of the state

I would never describe Hatton, population about 750, as small. I’ve been in too many towns with only a few hundred — or even a few dozen — residents. To me, Hatton is one of the many farm towns that dot the Upper Midwest. Every town is unique, of course, but, like Hatton, they all play an invaluable role in agriculture in this part of the world. That’s something to be proud of.

Read my story on Eastern Ag Day on the Agweek web site on in our Feb. 10 print edition.

 

One thought on “‘Small’ towns in eye of beholder

  1. Clearly, I would have been insulted. There is no greater place to be than N. D. nor Minnesota to know the greatest people in the world!!!!

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